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Twenty-something.
ATL » SF. Never not eating.

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  1. kateoplis:

    If the newest, last stretch of the High Line doesn’t make you fall in love with New York all over again, I really don’t know what to say. Phase 3 of the elevated park, which opens on Sunday, is a heartbreaker, swinging west on 30th Street from 10th Avenue toward the Hudson River, straight into drop-dead sunset views. It spills into a feral grove of big-tooth aspen trees on 34th Street.

    It’s hard to believe now that some New Yorkers once thought renovating the decrepit elevated rail line was a lousy idea. Not since Central Park opened in 1857 has a park reshaped New Yorkers’ thinking about public space and the city more profoundly. Like Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim museum in Spain, it has spread a dream, albeit largely a pipe dream, around the world: how one exceptional design — in this case, a work of landscape architecture — might miraculously alter a whole neighborhood, even a whole city’s fortunes.

    Yes, at roughly $35 million, Phase 3, like the rest of the High Line, cost more per acre than probably any park in human history. With most city parks struggling to make ends meet, that kind of money is an inevitable source of resentment, notwithstanding that the High Line was, in significant measure, constructed and is almost exclusively maintained with private funds.”

    But this third phase completes a kind of narrative, which the two earlier phases started, about 21st-century New York as a greener, sleeker metropolis, riven by wealth, with an anxious eye in the rearview mirror. It is a Rorschach test, signifying different things — about urban renewal, industry, gentrification, the environment — to different people. Occupying an in-between sort of space between buildings, neighborhoods, street and sky, the park makes a convenient receptacle for meaning. Neither an authentic ruin nor entirely built from scratch, a sign of runaway capital but also common ground, it is a modern landmark capitalizing on the romance of a bygone New York — the “real,” gritty city — a park born of the very forces that swept that city away.”

    Photos: NG

    Swoon.

  2. The Roving Typist (by Mark)

    Just wonderful.

  3. Bergdorf and Me

    Currently watching “Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s” on Netflix. So good! It’s both a blessing and a curse that there’s only one in the world, located at 57th and 5th. I still remember the time my mom took me to the restaurant for lunch, the time I almost bought Manolo mary janes (not an urban shoe myth!) before I talked myself out of it, and just the general feeling of warmth I get when I walk in.

    It’s a beautiful New York institution and I miss it dearly. 

  4. Your Voice for a Livable, Resilient New York - The Municipal Art Society of New York (by Municipal ArtSociety)

    I may be moving from Atlanta to San Francisco in less than 2 weeks, but NYC will always have my heart. 

  5. humansofnewyork:

He started out cracking jokes, but when I showed him the format of the blog, he got very serious and said: 
“I know what I want you to write by my photo.”“What’s that?”“Good people find each other. Bad people get found out.”
humansofnewyork:

He started out cracking jokes, but when I showed him the format of the blog, he got very serious and said: 
“I know what I want you to write by my photo.”“What’s that?”“Good people find each other. Bad people get found out.”
    High Resolution

    humansofnewyork:

    He started out cracking jokes, but when I showed him the format of the blog, he got very serious and said: 

    “I know what I want you to write by my photo.”
    “What’s that?”
    “Good people find each other. Bad people get found out.”

    (via thiscozyskull)

  6. Words by John Updike, print by Two Arms Inc.
(via swissmiss)

    Words by John Updike, print by Two Arms Inc.

    (via swissmiss)

  7. Scatter My Ashes At Bergdorf’s

    Really looking forward to seeing this (the again, most fashion documentaries are fantastic)! Bergdorf Goodman has a special place in my heart: I still remember the first time my mom took me to Bergdorfs to go shopping and have tea… and the time I bought my first pair of Jimmy Choos. 

    So yeah, being buried under a pile of couture and New York City history wouldn’t be a terribly horrible way to go. 

  8. The Lowline: A Proposed Underground Park in Manhattan : The New Yorker
Highline, meet the Lowline:
Well, the idea is simple, if also complicated: new technology makes it possible for us to gather light and funnel it underground. And while New York City may be short on land, it has an abundance of underground space that’s not being used by the city’s transit authority, the M.T.A. (If you’ve spent any time on the subway, you’ve surely had the delirious experience of staring out a dark window only to be surprised by a renegade art project in an abandoned station—a graffiti mural, say, that shifts and moves as you hurtle by.) The Lowline concept, developed by Dan Barasch (formerly of PopTech) and James Ramsey of RAAD Studio, is to take one of the M.T.A.’s abandoned stations—the old Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal, which opened in 1903 and closed in 1948, after streetcars stopped running—and turn it into a public park.

    The Lowline: A Proposed Underground Park in Manhattan : The New Yorker

    Highline, meet the Lowline:

    Well, the idea is simple, if also complicated: new technology makes it possible for us to gather light and funnel it underground. And while New York City may be short on land, it has an abundance of underground space that’s not being used by the city’s transit authority, the M.T.A. (If you’ve spent any time on the subway, you’ve surely had the delirious experience of staring out a dark window only to be surprised by a renegade art project in an abandoned station—a graffiti mural, say, that shifts and moves as you hurtle by.) The Lowline concept, developed by Dan Barasch (formerly of PopTech) and James Ramsey of RAAD Studio, is to take one of the M.T.A.’s abandoned stations—the old Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal, which opened in 1903 and closed in 1948, after streetcars stopped running—and turn it into a public park.



  9. Will Ferrell’s Laid-Back New York Loft : Architectural Digest
I don’t know why, but I was really expecting it to be fratastic.  Will Ferrell’s Laid-Back New York Loft : Architectural Digest
I don’t know why, but I was really expecting it to be fratastic. 
    High Resolution

    Will Ferrell’s Laid-Back New York Loft : Architectural Digest

    I don’t know why, but I was really expecting it to be fratastic. 

  10. "I love New York, even though it isn’t mine, the way something has to be, a tree or a street or a house, something, anyway, that belongs to me because I belong to it."

     - Truman Capote
  11. "There are roughly three New Yorks. There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born there, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size, its turbulence as natural and inevitable. Second, there is the New York of the commuter — the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night. Third there is New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New york in quest of something. Of these trembling cities the greatest is the last — the city of final destination, the city that is a goal. It is this third city that accounts for New York’s high strung disposition, its poetical deportment, its dedication to the arts, and its incomparable achievements. Commuters give the city its tidal restlessness, natives give it solidity and continuity, but the settlers give it passion. And whether it is a farmer arriving from a small town in Mississippi to escape the indignity of being observed by her neighbors, or a boy arriving from the Corn Belt with a manuscript in his suitcase and a pain in his heart, it makes no difference: each embraces New York with the fresh eyes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Edison Company."

     -

    E.B. White, “Here is New York”

    Just when I thought I’ve moved on from the city I was once obsessed with, I discover a love letter he left me. 

    (Found via)

  12. thatkindofwoman:

    So interesting, and logical for small spaces in the city. 

    Manhattan Mini Apartment Packs 6 Rooms into 1 Transformable Space

    Genius. I love smart design. 

  13. (via Anna & Andrew | Chic Jewish Wedding at The Foundry | Snippet & Ink)
Beautiful wedding at The Foundry in NYC. (via Anna & Andrew | Chic Jewish Wedding at The Foundry | Snippet & Ink)
Beautiful wedding at The Foundry in NYC.
    High Resolution

    (via Anna & Andrew | Chic Jewish Wedding at The Foundry | Snippet & Ink)

    Beautiful wedding at The Foundry in NYC.

  14. This is The Best Restaurant in Brooklyn
It’s neither the flashiest, the newest, nor the most hyped, but it’s our favorite.
I want to go to there.  This is The Best Restaurant in Brooklyn
It’s neither the flashiest, the newest, nor the most hyped, but it’s our favorite.
I want to go to there. 
    High Resolution

    This is The Best Restaurant in Brooklyn

    It’s neither the flashiest, the newest, nor the most hyped, but it’s our favorite.

    I want to go to there. 

  15. Joey Ramone - New York City (by JoeyRamoneVEVO)

    Love the video. Love the cameos. Love the song.