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Twenty-something.
Atlanta. Never not eating.

The views expressed here are my own and do not represent the views of my employers. No one should be held responsible for my stupid thoughts.

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  1. Yao Lu reflects on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization in China by depicting classical Chinese landscapes as disguised photos of landfills. 
(via Colossal) Yao Lu reflects on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization in China by depicting classical Chinese landscapes as disguised photos of landfills. 
(via Colossal)
    High Resolution

    Yao Lu reflects on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization in China by depicting classical Chinese landscapes as disguised photos of landfills. 

    (via Colossal)

  2. 2012/01 Ping Fu from CreativeMornings on Vimeo.

    swissmiss | CreativeMornings: Ping Fu

    "Bamboo is flexible, bending in the wind but never breaking."

    Ping Fu, a pioneering software innovator and Silicon Valley entrepreneur, gives a talk to CreativeMornings about happiness and resilience. Before she was entrepreneur of the year, she grew up knowing what it’s like to be a child soldier, a factory worker, and a political prisoner during Mao’s Cultural Revolution (1966-76). 

    To Mao, the Cultural Revolution was his vision for a resurgence of possibilities and prosperity for his people. But in reality, the results were (albeit in my western-taught perspective) devastating: Thousands of books were burned, teachers were persecuted and publicly humiliated, individuals were jailed if they possessed copies of western literature/culture, families were torn apart by betrayal… the effects are still felt today. 

    I hear stories from my mom and Ping Fu and I thank my lucky stars (every single one of them) that billions of years of evolution and circumstances have led to where and who I am today. Hearing their stories, I imagine what could have been and I’m so incredibly grateful that they’re just that: imaginary. It makes me appreciate my mother so much more for making her life here, more than I think she’ll ever know. 

    (via swiss-miss)

  3. Just Because: Tricycle Calligraphy 水书法器 (by Jonah Kessel)

    Media Artist Nicholas Hanna built a tricycle that can also paint Chinese characters on the ground as it moves, just — because.

    Water Calligraphy has a long history in China, normally characterized by older Chinese men painting characters on the ground of parks with long brushes and water.

    Nicholas’ version is a wee bit more complicated.

    Learn more about this project here.
  4. How to Win Over the Chinese Consumer (by bigthink)

    Fascinating. Really well put! Tom Doctoroff of JWT pretty much says everything I’ve spent a lifetime trying to decipher. 

  5. For optimal experience, pick the greyest day of your stay in Beijing (one that bears clouds threatening rain) and skip the touristy part of the wall to the part that’s a little further out. 
I remember going on the Wall when I was about 8-10 years old. It was misty and grey, and I ran a little over a mile down the wall, with my poor dad panting and chasing after me. My path wasn’t swarming with tourists; there were only a few students meandering and taking photos. Dad was only a few yards away, but I felt alone. Looking out into the distance, I was hit with an overwhelming realization of just how large time and space was and how I was but an insignificant speck in the universe. 
My legs buckled under me with both relief and exhaustion.  For optimal experience, pick the greyest day of your stay in Beijing (one that bears clouds threatening rain) and skip the touristy part of the wall to the part that’s a little further out. 
I remember going on the Wall when I was about 8-10 years old. It was misty and grey, and I ran a little over a mile down the wall, with my poor dad panting and chasing after me. My path wasn’t swarming with tourists; there were only a few students meandering and taking photos. Dad was only a few yards away, but I felt alone. Looking out into the distance, I was hit with an overwhelming realization of just how large time and space was and how I was but an insignificant speck in the universe. 
My legs buckled under me with both relief and exhaustion. 
    High Resolution

    For optimal experience, pick the greyest day of your stay in Beijing (one that bears clouds threatening rain) and skip the touristy part of the wall to the part that’s a little further out. 

    I remember going on the Wall when I was about 8-10 years old. It was misty and grey, and I ran a little over a mile down the wall, with my poor dad panting and chasing after me. My path wasn’t swarming with tourists; there were only a few students meandering and taking photos. Dad was only a few yards away, but I felt alone. Looking out into the distance, I was hit with an overwhelming realization of just how large time and space was and how I was but an insignificant speck in the universe. 

    My legs buckled under me with both relief and exhaustion. 

    (Source: ninbra, via worlds-and-words)

  6. matteo (by tiger in a jar)

    Matteo is a band that plays a combination of Western and Chinese instruments including gu zheng ( 古筝, also known as a zither), ma tou qin (马头琴), er hu (二胡), and liu qin (柳琴). 

    They’re currently trying to raise funds on Kickstarter to be artists-in-residence at Sichuan University. Their music is pretty impressive, especially since they’re self-taught on the Chinese instruments. 

    I have a soft spot for traditional Chinese music, because I have really great memories of listening to old songs with my dad. I don’t listen to it often, but when I do, it makes me feel really comfortable and calm. The sound is unbelievably beautiful and the people who play them, from buskers to concert performers, take great pride in their craft. 

    Listen to a cover of Adele’s “Rolling In The Deep” on gu zheng here.

    Listen to the er hu here (one of the saddest-sounding instruments I’ve ever heard).

    Listen to the ma tou qin (which originated from Mongolia and is known as the morin khuur) here.

    Listen to the liu qin here.

    And one of my favorite instruments, right below the zither, is the pi pa (琵琶, which is just a larger version of the liu qin). Listen to one here.

    Now listen to most of them together (accompanied by the odd harmonica) in one of the most ubiquitous songs in China, Jasmine Flower (茉莉花, mo li hua). I think it’s the only Chinese song I can remember the lyrics to.

    Wow, that Matteo video really brought back a lot of old memories. That concludes this lesson of Traditional Chinese Musical Instruments 101. Thanks for sticking around!

    And no, I will not sing the jasmine flower song for you.

  7. condenasttraveler:

China’s Chic Retreat | Naked Stables in Moganshan, China
condenasttraveler:

China’s Chic Retreat | Naked Stables in Moganshan, China
    High Resolution

    condenasttraveler:

    China’s Chic Retreat | Naked Stables in Moganshan, China

    (via thatkindofwoman)

  8. Some fake Apple Stores popped up around Kunming (a city that would be very very low on Apple’s list of future store locations). The saddest thing is that all of the people who work there actually think they work for Apple!
(via Are you listening, Steve Jobs? « BirdAbroad) Some fake Apple Stores popped up around Kunming (a city that would be very very low on Apple’s list of future store locations). The saddest thing is that all of the people who work there actually think they work for Apple!
(via Are you listening, Steve Jobs? « BirdAbroad)
    High Resolution

    Some fake Apple Stores popped up around Kunming (a city that would be very very low on Apple’s list of future store locations). The saddest thing is that all of the people who work there actually think they work for Apple!

    (via Are you listening, Steve Jobs? « BirdAbroad)

  9. sympathyfortheartgallery:

Ai Weiwei. Fountain of Light (2007)
This is a reinterpretation of the ‘Tatlin tower’; From wikipedia: ‘It was planned to be erected in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, as the headquarters and monument of the Comintern (the third international).’
It never looked so alive, radiant, dare i say it, positive, as in this version of Ai Weiwei. He lives in communist China, and is currently being detained by the police.
If you saw the ‘imagine’ documentary on him, as I suggested you do, it is clear that he loves his country, if not the communist party/ the current government. But this work makes me realize that there is / was opportunity for them to gain some respect/ build some enthousiasm using his work. Not that I think that was the motivation of Ai Weiwei to make this piece exactly. But it seems to confirm a suspicion that I have: That artists are not really working in the political realm for the political stances to be emphasized, just to communicate some sort of truth about life or reality or humanity. The alluring seducing shiny aura of communism may well be part of that, as well as the tragedy of an earthquake, or the heaviness of surveillance pressing down on the persons being watched.
Ai Weiwei has been one of the most surprising and inspiring artists I have gotten to know the last year. I hope with all my heart he will be alright.

    sympathyfortheartgallery:

    Ai Weiwei.
    Fountain of Light (2007)

    This is a reinterpretation of the ‘Tatlin tower’; From wikipedia: ‘It was planned to be erected in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, as the headquarters and monument of the Comintern (the third international).’

    It never looked so alive, radiant, dare i say it, positive, as in this version of Ai Weiwei. He lives in communist China, and is currently being detained by the police.

    If you saw the ‘imagine’ documentary on him, as I suggested you do, it is clear that he loves his country, if not the communist party/ the current government. But this work makes me realize that there is / was opportunity for them to gain some respect/ build some enthousiasm using his work. Not that I think that was the motivation of Ai Weiwei to make this piece exactly. But it seems to confirm a suspicion that I have: That artists are not really working in the political realm for the political stances to be emphasized, just to communicate some sort of truth about life or reality or humanity. The alluring seducing shiny aura of communism may well be part of that, as well as the tragedy of an earthquake, or the heaviness of surveillance pressing down on the persons being watched.

    Ai Weiwei has been one of the most surprising and inspiring artists I have gotten to know the last year. I hope with all my heart he will be alright.

  10. Chinese Newspaper Breaks Silence on Ai Weiwei|| artforum.com / news

    standardgrey:

    04.06.11

    No one has heard from Ai Weiwei since last Sunday, when he was stopped from boarding a flight at Beijing airport and escorted away by police, together with his friend Wan Tao. Until today, the Chinese authorities refused to comment on his whereabouts, despite calls for his release from the UK, the United States, and the European Union, reports Malcom Moore for The Telegraph.

    However, in an ominous editorial, the Chinese state-run Global Times appeared to confirm the worst fears of Ai’s family, friends, and supporters. “Ai Weiwei … has been close to the red line of Chinese law. As long as Ai Weiwei continuously marches forward, he will inevitably touch the red line one day,” the newspaper wrote. “Ai Weiwei will be judged by history, but he will pay a price for his special choice,” it added. The newspaper also hinted that Ai had infringed the law by attempting to fly from Hong Kong to Taiwan without completing his “departure procedures.” Chinese citizens require a special permit to visit the island.

    Ai’s former lawyer, Pu Zhiqiang, said yesterday that Ai’s family had still not been informed of what had happened, and that the artist’s arrest was not “sensible or reasonable.” He added that he remained optimistic Ai would be released.

    His friends said Ai had steeled himself for such an outcome after years of criticizing the government. Hao Guang, a fellow artist in Beijing, said Ai “has known for a long time this day was coming.” He said, “In the past few years, since Wen Jiabao (the Chinese premier) began calling for justice and freedom, some people have been misled into thinking that we really should be fighting for justice and freedom. But as Ai said, being truly patriotic in China means committing a crime, because they still cannot tolerate different voices and they use a very simple, and sometimes violent approach, to make people toe the line.”

    Ai is the most prominent victim of a wide campaign to silence lawyers, activists, and writers in recent weeks, with dozens being “disappeared” or charged with inciting subversion.

    (via sympathyfortheartgallery)

  11. sexartandpolitics:

hyperallergic:

We’re liveblogging this important news … so click thru for more updates …

Bad news.

Oh Christ.  sexartandpolitics:

hyperallergic:

We’re liveblogging this important news … so click thru for more updates …

Bad news.

Oh Christ. 
    High Resolution

    sexartandpolitics:

    hyperallergic:

    We’re liveblogging this important news … so click thru for more updates …

    Bad news.

    Oh Christ. 

    (via sympathyfortheartgallery)